Category Archives: Civil Rights Movement

Transforming “Rubbertown”

Throgmorton, James A. Work in progress. “Transforming ‘Rubbertown’: The Rhetorical Construction of Sustainability and Environmental Justice in Louisville, Kentucky.” I’m still working on this paper, wanting to revise it in light of the “Toxic Talk” Symposium I directed back in … Continue reading

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Toxic Talk (2007)

In the fall of 2007, the University of Iowa’s Project on Rhetoric of Inquiry (POROI) sponsored a semester-long event entitled “Toxic Talk: A Symposium on Disciplinary Rhetorics, Environmental Justice, and Sustainability.” I had the opportunity to organize and conduct it. … Continue reading

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Marching from the Edmund Pettus Bridge to Obama

For a slightly different version, see Jim Throgmorton, J. A. 2009. “Marching from the Edmund Pettus Bridge to Obama.” Iowa City Press-Citizen (January 14): 15A. “Why are you going there?” my old friend Ray asked me a few days before … Continue reading

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Where Was the Wall Then? Where Is It Now?

James Throgmorton. 2004. Planning Theory & Practice 5, 3 (September): 349-365. This article investigates the power of ‘walls’ to constrain thought and silence diverse voices of reason within planning. Using die Mauer (The Berlin Wall) as a linking metaphor, this … Continue reading

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Planning as Persuasive Storytelling in a Global Scale Web of Relationships

James A. Throgmorton. 2003. Planning Theory 2, 2: 125-151. This article revisits my earlier (1996 and prior) claim that planning can be thought of as a form of persuasive storytelling about the future. It responds to three broad lines of … Continue reading

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